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Tag Archive: ID size

Multi-Cylinders conduits calculation

Cylinders conduits flow

Cylinder’s flow

These calculations can help you to figure-out conduits (hoses, pipes or tubes) parameters (ID sizes, piston speed, flow velocity and cylinder’s force) for any qty of cylinders connected in parallel circuit.

Calculations Notes:

  • The recommended flow velocity in conduits you can find at the article Recommended flow velocity.
  • The assumption: if you use more than 1 cylinder in calculations, all cylinders have the same parameters (bore/rod diameters, stroke and friction)
  • The assumption: Pressure and Return lines conduits (flow source – flow divider and flow divider – tank) have the same ID size.
  • The assumption: the conduits between flow divider and cylinders have the same ID size.

ID, OD and Dash size

Summary:

  • What is dash size?

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Dash size is the common method used to refer to the diameter of a hose or tube in 1/16″ increments.

For hoses this is a value for Inside Diameter, or I.D. For example, -6 hose would indicate a hose with inside diameter of 6/16″ – or 3/8″.

For tubes this is a value for Outside Diameter, or O.D. For example, a -10 tube would indicate a tube with an outside diameter of 10/16″ – or 5/8″.

dash_02

By the way, dash sizes do not correspond to the exact hose inside dimension. Actual ID’s are smaller.

There are couple examples how to mark piping size at the schematic using dash size:

dash_01

 

So, if you found at the drawing, for example, (-6) size, this means:

  • For Hose: Internal Diameter is approx. 3/8″
  • For Tube: Outside Diameter is 3/8″, therefore an Internal Diameter will be much smaller.

This is why sizes of tube and pipe have to be selected accurately, especially if you are going to connect them (for example, trough bulkhead fitting). Otherwise, you can get different flow rate and extra pressure drop in the line with smaller size.